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One Health is the collaborative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain sustainable optimal health for the ecosystem*. It is a cultural and behavioral concept with socioeconomic elements and impact.

*a biological community of living organisms (humans, animals, plants, and microbes) and their physical environment interacting as a system

One Health Hires

Weihsueh A. Chiu

Weihsueh A. Chiu

College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Before joining Texas A&M in January 2015, Chiu was an environmental health scientist in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment. Chiu earned his Ph.D. in Physics from Princeton University then worked at the U.S. Governmental Accountability Office (GAO), where he conducted investigations for Congress on risk assessment topics. His research specialties include quantitative health risk assessment, dose-response assessment, statistical modeling of environmental and biological systems, and pharmacokinetics. He is particularly interested in integrating data across disciplines to provide quantitative estimates of risk and/or benefit. Chiu currently is in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences at the CVM.

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Mark Lawley

Mark Lawley

Dwight Look College of Engineering

Lawley is currently the Texas A&M University Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) Research Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Dwight Look College of Engineering.  His research interests focus on supervisory control and optimal decision making in large man-made systems with applications in manufacturing, large-scale infrastructure and health care delivery.  Prior to his joining Texas A&M, Lawley was a member of the engineering faculty at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana for 17 years.  Through his research, Lawley is known for his willingness to engage and work with others inside and outside academia and believes that the essence of university research and engagement involves mutually beneficial collaborations.

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Dr. Michael Madigan

Michael Madigan

Dwight Look College of Engineering

As a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madigan and his group study the dynamics and neuromuscular control of human movement using both human subject experimentation and computer modeling.  His specific research interests include understanding the underlying factors contributing to mobility impairment, balance problems, and falls due to their high prevalence and impact on society. Past work has included low back pain and sports mechanics.

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Thomas Meek

Thomas Meek

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences

Meek’s research focuses on enzyme mechanisms and rational design of enzyme inhibitors in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.  The availability of known point mutations that are causative of human cancers, along with genomic descriptions of many pathogens, provides an emerging means to identify new or known enzymes that would constitute potential drug targets. The Meek laboratory designs and synthesizes candidate inhibitors, and tests them against enzyme targets to determine their suitability as potential drug candidates. Meek received his PhD in Organic Chemistry from Penn State University and served as Vice President of Biological Reagents and Assay Development at GlaxoSmithKline in Pennsylvania prior to coming to Texas A&M.

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Ken Muneoka

Ken Muneoka

College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Muneoka’s research on regeneration focuses on the cellular and molecular factors that can reprogram stem cells to be more embryonic, potentially maximizing the body’s natural potential to regenerate. Building on previous research in salamanders and on the regenerative responses of mice digits, Muneoka’s lab developed a mammalian model for endogenous regeneration. Muneoka’s inquisitive drive continues to extend the impact of his research at Texas A&M, where he promotes graduate and undergraduate education in multiple academic departments.  Muneoka is currently with the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, at the CVM.

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Ivan Rusyn

Ivan Rusyn

College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Rusyn received his MD from Ukrainian State Medical University in Kiev and his Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was professor of Environmental Sciences and Engineering until coming to Texas A&M. Rusyn’s areas of research include toxicology and environmental health sciences, especially developing highly mechanistic approaches to study the potential effects of environmental pollutants and other anthropogenic stressors on human health. He also focuses on the mechanisms of action of environmental toxicants, the genetic determinants of the susceptibility to toxicant-induced injury, and computational toxicology. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, at the CVM.

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Morgan Scott

Morgan Scott

College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

As a tenured epidemiology professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, at the CVM, Scott leads the development of the Microbial Ecology and Molecular Epidemiology (ME2) research laboratory.  Scott researches zoonotic disease control to improve food safety and public health and ultimately hopes to reduce resistance to antibiotics among zoonotic bacteria, which can be transferred from animals to humans. Scott and his team use microbiological and molecular methods to measure whether certain bacteria are resistant to antibiotics.  In addition to leading the ME2 lab, he teaches graduate courses on risk analysis, disease detection, and disease surveillance.

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